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        • About Us

          Forging future leaders for a globalized world, right here in Texas.

          Future leaders are not born, they are educated. And now more than ever, the world needs great leaders. Give your young student the best opportunity to become one of them at the Lycée International de Houston.

          When you choose a school, you choose the community in which your child and your family will live and grow for the coming years. That community matters, immensely: it must enrich, support, and inspire your child and family, all in equal measure. Our community has prepared students to navigate the world with confidence and empathy. We achieve this through rigorous bilingual, French, and International Baccalaureate education programs, and a vibrant school culture strengthened by multilingual, multinational educators, and families. Your student will develop the integrity, intelligence, and adaptability that are integral to forging exceptional international leaders. Your student will learn to master French and helping them cultivate a well-rounded, open-minded, and respectful worldview.

        • Passport to the World

          We are delighted that you have decided to explore the Lycée International de Houston Bilingual School. We appreciate that choosing the right school for your child is an important decision and we are here to help as you move through the admissions process.

          Our school offers a unique opportunity for your child to become fully bilingual, opening up to your child a future that extends beyond borders! Give your child a head start through a bilingual educational experience unlike any other in a safe, fun, and enriching environment. Nurture your child’s natural talents, give them the advantage of knowing multiple languages and cultures, and help them realize their full potential as an internationally focused and empowered leader.

          The world needs leaders now more than ever — will your child be one of them?

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          Creating Extraordinary Leaders Who Will Shape the 21st Century

          The Lycée International de Houston’s education is highly structured, rigorous, and inclusive. The curriculum is taught by highly motivated, supportive teachers who understand that establishing a relationship with your child unlocks the door to learning and future success. Your child will be empowered for both work and work ethic as we guide them academically and emotionally on their journey to becoming a strong leader.

          Our students pursue knowledge and understanding through deep inquiry. They develop critical thinking in order to better understand the complexity of the world and make wise choices. Our academic programs are enhanced by our world-class language immersion model. We are committed to help each student reach their highest possible level of language proficiency and to prepare them for our increasingly global, interconnected world.

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          Serving the needs of the whole student

          Our mission is to develop our students not only as learners, but also as individuals and global citizens. Our approach to fostering individuals and citizens rests on our values of excellence, rigor, and kindness, which are integrated into everything we do.

          We encourage our students to discover new personal interests and develop their passions through a varied program of athletics, arts, clubs, and other extracurricular activities. Whether it is music, dance, painting, or badminton, fencing, or soccer; the Lycée International de Houston has the facilities guaranteed to provide your child with a top-tier education that extends far beyond the classroom. We nurture students as individuals, focusing on helping them acquire skills for life, including self-confidence, team spirit, creativity, initiative, leadership, and entrepreneurship. We give our students all of the tools to let them cultivate new interests and live an active lifestyle!

        • Community

          We are proud of the diverse and inclusive community we have created and nurtured at the Lycée International de Houston — a community comprised of families, students, faculty, and staff representing more than 50 nationalities.

          We believe that a cohesive community of individuals from many backgrounds — socio-economic, ethnic, racial, linguistic, national, religious, and sexual orientation — provides the ideal setting for the development of respect and understanding and helps prepare students to thrive, collaborate, and innovate in an increasingly global, interconnected world.

          We take it to heart to be very family-oriented, to work and learn together, from each other, to strengthen our bond as a community. This enables us to create a warm, welcoming, and nurturing learning environment for our children, in class and beyond, which, we believe, is critical to help them thrive and grow.

          Being able to be part of a community that is culturally diverse and yet that has so much in common gives all of us a chance to develop friendships, share and celebrate our love for the French language and francophone cultures (through our programs and events), and help children embrace their multicultural background and build their bilingual identity

        • Giving

          Lycée International de Houston welcomes students as young as 18 months all the way up to high school grade levels. With our International Baccalaureate Program, students will be prepared for whatever challenges they face all around the globe.

           

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High School

High School

High School, called Lycée in France, starts in 10th grade and is a three-year course. The Lycée International de Houston offers two different tracks: the French Bac track and the International Baccalaureate track.

Widely considered to be the international gold standard in measuring depth and breadth of knowledge, critical thinking, and overall academic achievement, the French baccalaureate is an extended exam period taking place at the end of 11th and 12th grades. The French baccalaureate comprises 17 to 24 hours of essay exams and two to four oral exams, requiring students to summon not just “what they know” but to test their polemic, persuasive, and organizational skills. In addition to the traditional French baccalaureate, the Lycée offers two other courses of study, the Franc-American baccalaureate and the OIB baccalaureate. All three are considered by the French Ministry of National Education to be equally rigorous.

The International Baccalaureate Diploma Program is a comprehensive and challenging pre-university course that demands the best from both motivated students and teachers. The sophisticated two-year curriculum covers a wide range of academic subjects and has stood the test of time for over half a million students in 119 countries since 1968. IB Diploma Program graduates are welcomed by the world’s leading universities.

The Lycée International de Houston offers high school students the choice of the French Baccalaureate or International Baccalaureate Diploma program and has been accredited by the prestigious IB organization since 2020. The program is taught in English by a team of certified teachers who are experienced in multilingual and multicultural settings, thus guaranteeing it is truly an international school in Houston. The Lycée International de Houston International Baccalaureate students receive college credit or placement for much of their course work, as well as experience in a collegiate learning environment.

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Curriculum

Group 1: Language and Literature

English Language A and Literature – SL and HL (Grades 11 and 12)

The course is built on the assumption that literature is concerned with our conceptions, interpretations, and experiences of the world. The study of literature can therefore be seen as an exploration of the way it represents the complex pursuits, anxieties, joys, and fears to which human beings are exposed in the daily business of living. It enables an exploration of one of the more enduring fields of human creativity, and provides opportunities for encouraging independent, original, critical, and clear thinking. It also promotes respect for the imagination and a perceptive approach to the understanding and interpretation of literary works.

Through the study of a wide range of literature, the language A: literature course encourages students to appreciate the artistry of literature and to develop an ability to reflect critically on their reading. Works are studied in their literary and cultural contexts, through close study of individual texts and passages, and by considering a range of critical approaches. In view of the international nature of the IB and its commitment to intercultural understanding, the language A: literature course does not limit the study of works to the products of one culture or the cultures covered by any one language. The study of works in translation is especially important in introducing students, through literature, to other cultural perspectives. The response to the study of literature is through oral and written communication, thus enabling students to develop and refine their command of language. The course is divided into three sections.

  1. Readers, writers, and texts

This area of exploration introduces students to the nature of literature and its study. The investigation students will undertake involves close attention to the details of texts in a variety of literary forms to learn about the choices made by authors and the ways in which meaning is created. At the same time, study will focus on the role readers themselves play in generating meaning as students move from a personal response to an understanding and interpretation that is influenced by the community of readers of which they are a part. Their interaction with other readers will raise an awareness of the constructed and negotiated nature of meaning.

Likely Texts:

  1. Henry IV, Part One by Shakespeare (1597?) – drama
  2. The Reader by Bernhard Schlink (1995) – novel (in translation)
  3. Night by Elie Wiesel (1956) – nonfiction (in translation)
  4. Alive by Piers Paul Read (1974) – nonfiction
    1. Time and Space – Spring

This area of exploration focuses on the idea that literary texts are neither created nor received in a vacuum. It explores the variety of cultural contexts in which literary texts are written and read across time and space as well as the ways literature itself—in its content—mirrors the world at large. Students will examine how cultural conditions can shape the production of a literary text, how a literary text can reflect or refract cultural conditions, and the ways culture and identity influence reception.

Likely Texts:

  1. We by Yevgeny Zamyatin (1921) – novel (in translation)
  2. Chronicle of a Death Foretold by Gabriel Garcia Marquez (1981) – novel (in translation)
  3. The Rover by Aphra Behn (1677) – drama
  4. *Sir Gawain & the Green Knight by Anonymous (late 1300s) – poem (in translation)
  5. *The Wind-up Bird Chronicle by Haruki Murakami (1994) – novel (in translation) * equals HL only
    1. Intertextuality: Connecting texts – Fall senior year

This area of exploration focuses on intertextual concerns or the connections between and among diverse literary texts, traditions, creators and ideas. It focuses on the comparative study of literary texts so that students may gain deeper appreciation of both unique characteristics of individual literary texts and complex systems of connection. Throughout the course, students will be able to see similarities and differences among literary texts. This area allows for a further exploration of literary concerns, examples, interpretations and readings by studying a grouping of works set by the teacher or set in close conversation with a class or groups of students.

Likely Texts: Theme of Women and Identity

  1. Persepolis by Marjane Satrapi (2000) – graphic novel (in translation)
  2. The Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood (1985) – novel
  3. *Wide Sargasso Sea by Jean Rhys (1966) – novel
  4. Beloved by Toni Morrison (1987) – novel * equals HL only

French Language A and Literature – SL and HL (Grades 11 and 12)

In the language A: language and literature course students study a wide range of literary and non-literary texts in a variety of media. By examining communicative acts across literary form and textual type alongside appropriate secondary readings, students will investigate the nature of language itself and the ways in which it shapes and is influenced by identity and culture. Approaches to study in the course are meant to be wide ranging and can include literary theory, sociolinguistics, media studies and critical discourse analysis, among others.

The course is articulated around the following themes:

  • Readers, writers, and texts
  • Time and space
  • Intertextuality: connecting texts

The Assessment is as follows:

External Assessment: May Final

Examinations

Paper 1: Guided textual analysis

Paper 2: Comparative essay

HL essay (High-level only)

Internal Assessment: Individual oral

This two-year course is aimed at the preparation of the International Baccalaureate Diploma and can be taken at the Standard Level or at the Higher Level. Both levels are taught at a native level and will allow the students to obtain a Bilingual International Baccalaureate Diploma.

Group 2: Language Acquisition

Language Acquisition (Grades 11 and 12)

The Group 2 courses provide students with the opportunity to acquire or develop an additional language and to promote an understanding of other cultures through the study of language.

The aims are to develop students’ intercultural understanding; enable them to understand and use the language they have studied in a range of contexts and for a variety of purposes; and encourage, through the study of texts and through social interaction, an awareness and appreciation of the different perspectives of people of other cultures.

Assessments aim to test students’ ability to understand and use the target language. Students will be assessed on their ability to communicate clearly and effectively in a range of situations, demonstrating linguistic competence and intercultural understanding; use language appropriate to a range of interpersonal and/or cultural contexts; and understand, analyze, and respond to a range of written and spoken texts.

There are three levels of language acquisition courses in the IBDP, Language B Higher Level, Language B Standard Level, and Language ab initio Standard Level. The placement is based on the student’s level of proficiency developed to be able to communicate effectively. The level of communication, knowledge and skills will determine the appropriate Group 2 course. LIH offers these courses in French, and Spanish. These two-year courses are taught in the target language.

The Common European Framework of Reference (CEFR) defines levels of proficiency as follows: A1 – Beginner; A2 – Elementary; B1 – Intermediate; B2 – Upper Intermediate; C1 – Advanced; C2 – Mastery. At the end of ninth grade, students should attain the A2 (Elementary) level.

Language B – SL (CEFR B2)

Designed for students who possess a degree of knowledge and experience in the target language, this course meets for a total of 150 hours during the school year.

The course is articulated along the five following prescribed topics: identities, experiences, human ingenuity, social organization, and sharing the planet.

Language B – HL (CEFR B2+/C1)

Designed for students who possess a degree of knowledge and experience in the target language, this course meets for a total of 240 hours during the school year.

The course is articulated along the five following prescribed topics: identities, experiences, human ingenuity, social organization, and sharing the planet.

Students must also study two literary works used as stimulus for the exploration of ideas.

Examples of work studied are:

French B – HL A variety of texts including novels, short stories, and poems by Eric-Emmanuel Schmitt, Guy de Maupassant, Roch Carrier, Jacques Prévert.

Spanish B – HL Literary works by Quiroga, Matute, Borges, Cortazar, Buero Vallejo, Denevi.

Group: 3 Individuals and Societies

Group 3: History – SL and HL (Grades 11 and 12)

The IB History course is a demanding, writing-intensive, two-year program that covers the global events and themes that have shaped the modern world. The course traces modern world history through the lens of society, politics, and economics.

All students (Standard Level and Higher Level) will study two world history topics. The two World history topics will be selected by the teacher. Possible topics include, but are not limited to, the following:

Origins, Development, and Impact of Industrialization (1750-2005)

Emergence and Development of Independent States (1848-2000)

Authoritarian States (20th Century)

Causes and Effects of 20th Century Wars

The Cold War: Superpower Tensions and Rivalries (20th Century)

In addition, all students (Standard Level and Higher Level) will explore the theme of Rights and Protest through an in depth look at two case studies (Civil Rights in the United States and Apartheid in South Africa). Students will be required to carefully evaluate the origin, purpose, and content of a variety of sources while also developing their critical and analytical thinking skills.

Students who choose Higher Level History will also engage in a more in-depth study of the Americas, studying the society, politics, and economics of the region through selected themes.

All students will develop their ability to analyze and interpret both primary and secondary sources. In the second year of the program, students will be required to complete a Historical Investigation, an IB-specific research paper in which they not only conduct research but also critically evaluate their sources and reflect on the challenges facing historians.

Group 4: Sciences

Biology – SL and HL (Grades 11 and 12)

IB Biology is a two-year course that follows the International Baccalaureate syllabus. The emphasis of this course is on a practical approach in which students design investigations, collect data, develop manipulative skills, analyze results, and evaluate and communicate their conclusions. Students develop the skills to work independently and collaboratively as they parallel the way in which scientists work in the broader community.

Topics covered in the first year include cell biology, molecular biology, metabolism (photosynthesis and respiration), genetics, evolution and biodiversity.

Topics in the second year include human physiology, plant biology, and ecology.

The objectives of the course are to develop experimental and investigative skills, create awareness of the ethical implications of using science and technology, and develop an appreciation of the potentials and limitations of science and technology in understanding the workings of nature.

Difference Between SL and HL

SL and HL students undertake a common core syllabus, a common internal assessment (IA) scheme, and a common Group 4 project and have overlapping elements in the option studied.

Whereas the skills and activities are common to students at both the SL and HL, HL students are required to study some topics in greater depth, in the additional HL material and in the common option. The difference between SL and HL is mainly one of breadth and depth.

Chemistry – SL (Grades 11 and 12)

This two-year course taught in English follows the specifications of the curriculum of the International Baccalaureate. The whole class meets for a total of five periods a week with SL students being dismissed from time to time while HL only requirements are covered. Students will learn about measurement and data-processing throughout both years, especially during experimental work.

Topics covered in the first year (grade 11) are stoichiometric relationships, atomic structure, periodicity, chemical bonding, energetics, and kinetics.

Topics covered in the second year (grade 12) include equilibrium, acids and bases, redox processes, and organic chemistry. Students then work on one of the four following options: materials; biochemistry; energy; or medicinal chemistry.

In addition to the previously mentioned topics, towards the end of the first-year students will work on a multidisciplinary project (Group 4 project) in collaboration with students from all the sciences.

Independently, at the beginning of the second year, every student will select an individual investigation on a theme of their choice to explore, analyze, and evaluate and then communicate their findings as part of their Internal Assessment (IA), which will be part of their IB final grade.

Difference Between SL and HL

SL and HL students undertake a common core syllabus, a common internal assessment (IA) scheme, and a common Group 4 project and have overlapping elements in the option studied.

Whereas the skills and activities are common to students at both the SL and HL, HL students are required to study some topics in greater depth, in the additional HL material and in the common option. The difference between SL and HL is mainly one of breadth and depth.

Physics – SL and HL (Grades 11 and 12)

Topics covered in the first year include measurement and uncertainty, mechanics, waves, thermal physics, and electricity and magnetism. There will be a self-study unit on energy over the winter break. Topics for year two will include circular motion; gravity; atomic, nuclear, and particle physics; energy production; and astrophysics.

The objectives of the course are to build and learn to apply a body of knowledge about physics and the methods and techniques of scientific thinking; develop experimental and investigative scientific skills; and encourage an appreciation for the history and limitations of humanity’s remarkable progress in applying the scientific method to understand the workings of nature.

Difference Between SL and HL

The HL Physics course is designed to give students good preparation for the demands of university calculus-based courses in physics. Students with a strong interest in fields such as engineering, physics, mathematics, or architecture should consider HL. Students who do not expect to pursue any further study of science at the university level should consider SL.

SL and HL students study the same set of “core” topics, but HL students’ study some of the topics in greater depth. Both levels will undertake an Internal Assessment, in which the student independently investigates a topic of interest to him or her. The course is taught in English.

Group 5: Mathematics

Mathematical Application and Interpretation – SL (150 hours)

This course is intended for students interested in the application of mathematics to solve everyday problems and offers good preparation for the study of social sciences, humanities, certain economics courses, statistics courses, and the arts.

  • Number and Algebra – 16 hours
  • Functions – 31 hours
  • Trigonometry and Geometry – 18 hours
  • Statistics and Probability – 36 hours
  • Calculus – 19 hours
  • Mathematical Exploration – 30 hours

Mathematics: applications and interpretation: Distinction between SL and HL Students who choose Mathematics: applications and interpretation at SL or HL should enjoy seeing mathematics used in real-world contexts and to solve real-world problems. Students who wish to take Mathematics: applications and interpretation at higher level will have good algebraic skills and experience of solving real-world problems. They will be students who get pleasure and satisfaction when exploring challenging problems and who are comfortable to undertake this exploration using technology.

Mathematical Analysis and Approaches – SL and HL

This course is for students who want to pursue a university course with a substantial mathematical element, such as engineering, physics, or technology. Students will become fluent in the construction of mathematical arguments and develop strong skills in mathematical thinking. They also will explore real and abstract applications of these ideas. Students who take this course are those who enjoy the thrill of mathematical problem-solving and generalization.

Group 5: Mathematical Analysis and Approaches – SL (150 hours)

  • Number and Algebra – 19 hours
  • Functions – 21 hours
  • Trigonometry and Geometry – 25 hours
  • Statistics and Probability – 27 hours
  • Calculus – 28 hours
  • Mathematical Exploration – 30 hours

Mathematical Analysis and Approaches – HL (240 hours)

  • Number and Algebra – 39 hours
  • Functions – 32 hours
  • Trigonometry and Geometry – 51 hours
  • Statistics and Probability – 33 hours
  • Calculus – 55 hours
  • Mathematical Exploration – 30 hours

Group 6: The Arts

Visual Art SL and HL (Grade 11 and 12)

The 2-year IBDP visual arts course celebrates the dynamic and ever-changing nature of the visual arts through the making of images and objects, as well as in the appreciation, enjoyment, respect for and response to practices of artmaking by people from around the world. It is a thought-provoking course in which students develop analytical skills in problem-solving and divergent thinking, while working towards technical proficiency and confidence as art-makers.

The IBDP Visual Arts course in Higher and Standard Level focuses on three core elements of contemporary art theory and practice:

  • Visual arts in context
  • Communicating visual arts
  • Visual arts methods

All three core syllabus areas will be explored through three practices: Theoretical practice, art-making practice, and curatorial practice. The course content is also divided into three components:

  • Students will research across cultures and historic eras to produce an academically sound comparative study in the format of a digital slideshow.
  • Students will produce a discrete body of artworks, exploring a range of mediums and methods.
  • Students will curate a culminative exhibition of their own work.

Throughout the two-year program students will consolidate their research investigations, creative ideas and curatorial plans in a visual arts journal which functions as the central, connecting and pivoting platform of the course.

Additional: The Bilingual IB Diploma

Students have the option to earn a Bilingual IB Diploma. This diploma is awarded to students who have successfully undertaken specific classes and requirements in a second language, such as:

  • Two studies in Language and Literature in different languages.
  • A Humanities subject in French.
  • A Science subject in French.

Core Courses

Theory of Knowledge

Theory of Knowledge (Grades 11 and 12)

Theory of Knowledge (TOK) is a course that fully explores what it means to think critically. Students focus on inquiring into the process of knowing, rather than on acquiring a specific body of knowledge. They learn to examine how knowledge is built and evaluated by individuals and societies, recognize the validity of different perspectives, and learn to test and challenge their own assumptions. As part of the IB Diploma Program core, TOK makes use of the knowledge gained in other subject courses, as well as knowledge gained outside the classroom from the media or through CAS (Creativity, Activity, Service), for example, to pursue its exploration. While TOK is not a traditional content-focused course, to say that TOK is a course without content would be misleading. In order to succeed, students must become fluent in the specific analytical terminology of TOK and know and be able to analyze the various Ways of Knowing (WOKs), as well as the various Areas of Knowledge (AOKs). Each Area of Knowledge has a specific Knowledge Framework, which students will learn as well.

The central features of the TOK course are critical analysis questions, or Knowledge Questions. In order to effectively create and “unpack” Knowledge Questions, students need to be able to analyze knowledge claims and distinguish between shared knowledge (the sort gained from studying a given content area, for example) and personal knowledge (the sort that is difficult to communicate to others, such as experiential knowledge or certain abilities).

There are two assessment tasks in the TOK course: the essay and the presentation. At the end of the first year, students prepare an oral presentation, to be assessed internally, based on a real-world situation in which they explore a fundamental Knowledge Question that they have extracted from the situation. At the end of

the second year, students write a TOK essay based on one of six prescribed titles published earlier in the year by the IBO. This essay is externally assessed and counts for two-thirds of the student’s overall TOK exam score.

Creativity, Activity, Service (CAS)

Creativity, Activity, Service (CAS) (Grades 11 and 12)

CAS involves students in a range of activities alongside their academic studies. It enables them to enhance their personal and interpersonal development by learning through experience and provides opportunities for self-determination and collaboration with others, fostering a sense of accomplishment and enjoyment from the work. Students reflect on their CAS experiences as part of the IB Diploma Program and provide evidence of achieving eight learning outcomes for CAS.

The three strands of CAS, which are often interwoven with activities, are characterized as follows:

  • Creativity – Arts and other experiences that involve creative thinking
  • Activity – Physical exertion contributing to a healthy lifestyle, complementing academic work elsewhere in the IB Diploma Program
  • Service – An unpaid and voluntary exchange that has a learning benefit for the student. The rights, dignity, and autonomy of all those involved are respected.

In order to demonstrate these concepts, students are required to undertake a CAS Project. The project challenges students to show initiative, demonstrate perseverance, and develop skills such as collaboration, problem-solving, and decision-making.

CAS is also an important counterbalance to the academic pressures of the IB Diploma Program. This course is taught in English.

Extended Essay (EE)

Extended Essay (EE) (Grades 11 and 12)

The Extended Essay is an in-depth study of a focused topic chosen from the list of approved IB Diploma Program subjects—normally one of the student’s six chosen subjects for the IB Diploma. It is intended to promote high-level research and writing skills, intellectual discovery, and creativity. It provides students with an opportunity to engage in personal research on a topic of their choice, under the guidance of a supervisor. This in-depth study leads to a major piece of formally presented, structured writing in which ideas and findings are communicated in a reasoned and coherent manner appropriate to the subject chosen.

The Extended Essay is compulsory for all IB Diploma Program students. It is the result of approximately 40 hours of work by the student and presented as a formal piece of scholarship containing no more than 4,000 words. While working on the Extended Essay, students are provided the opportunity to develop research, communication, creative, and critical-thinking skills; engage a systematic process of research appropriate to the chosen subject; and experience the excitement of intellectual discovery. Although students are provided with some guidance from their supervisors at various stages of the process, the Extended Essay is largely meant to provide them with the opportunity to engage in independent research and writing.

The Extended Essay is externally assessed against common criteria, which is interpreted in ways appropriate to each subject. In combination with the grade for Theory of Knowledge, the Extended Essay contributes up to three points to the total score for the IB Diploma. This course is taught in English.

French Courses

10th grade

11th grade

12th grade

 

French Core Courses

10th Grade

Common lessons

Average weekly duration

French

4h00

History geography

3h00

English

4h00

Modern Language

2:30h00

Mathematics

4h00

Chemical Physics

3h00

Life and Earth Sciences (SVT)

1h30

Physical education and sport

2h00

Moral and civic education

18 hours a year

Digital science and technology

1h30

 

French – 10th grade

This course is for students who have followed the French Brevet class and are able to study French literature at the most rigorous level. The curriculum continues with the main objectives of the previous year but deepens reflective and analytical aptitudes. Analytical vocabulary and methodology are introduced in order to prepare students for the rigorous written and oral exigencies of the French Baccalaureate at the end of Grade 11. Students study canonical texts including theater, novels, philosophical works, and literary critiques from various periods. There is an emphasis on historical, intellectual, and artistic context.

Texts studied have included:

  • La Peste, Albert Camus
  • Le Rouge et le Noir, Stendhal
  • Andromaque, Racine
  • Dom Juan, Molière
  • Poetry from the Middle Ages to the Renaissance
  • Littérature d’idées

Students are also required to  complement their understanding of a genre with texts ranging from different time periods such as:

  • Antigone, Sophocle & Anouilh
  • Huis-Clos, Jean-Paul Sartre
  • Un barrage contre le Pacifique, Marguerite Duras
  • Le Sabotage Amoureux, Amélie Nothomb

History and Geography10th grade

The history component focuses on six major themes, each of which have been chosen to allow our students to better understand how the world in which we live has developed. These six topics, presented through political, religious, and cultural perspectives, permit students to comprehend European history at a time when trends towards globalization co-exist with an individual’s or a society’s identification with regional or ethnic goals.

The geography component examines many of the important questions that face humankind today. Why and how have we created so many diverse environments, such a multitude of complex relationships with specific geographies and climates, with fresh and saltwater, and with plants and animals? What is the role of each individual, and of each ethnic, political, and economic group, as we search for a better balance between humans and the environment? How do our choices impact the desire to achieve harmony between ethnic, political, and economic groups? Topics in civics are examined, including the meaning of citizenship, public civility and incivility, the melting pot, and citizenship and worker’s rights.

Mathematics – 10th Grade

This class continues to prepare students who intend to enter any level of the French Bac and IB math programs. The three main sub-sections of the course are: statistics (probability and data analysis), algebra (up to the analysis of functions), and geometry (Cartesian space, vector algebra, transformations, trigonometric functions, lines, and planes in space).

Physics and Chemistry – 10th Grade

In this course delivered in French, the students discover Physics and Chemistry concepts through three general themes: health, universe, and sports. The students will work on questions like: How can a star’s light give us information about the star? How can we extract, synthesize, and identify chemicals to create medicine?

The course tries to contextualize scientific concepts to interest students and provide them solid scientific skills for the Bac S or for IB Physics and Chemistry. The learning style is based on experimental and research activities. In Chemistry, the students will delve deeper into matter’s structure and its quantification. In Physics, the core will be waves, cinematic, fluid pression and spectrum studies. Students begin the program by analyzing the ways of measuring distances and times and going further on Newtonian mechanics. The chemistry program includes the study of chemical reactions, calculations of the quantities of matter, and study of matter (atoms).

In this course delivered in French, the students keep on deepening Physics and Chemistry concepts. The course tries to contextualize scientific concepts to interest students and provide them solid scientific skills for the Bac or for IB Physics and Chemistry. The learning style is active based and relies on experimental and research activities. In Chemistry, the students will delve deeper into matter’s structure and its quantification. In Physics, the core will be waves, optics, kinematic, Newtonian physics.

The curriculum is very broad, and students will work on questions like: Why are some chemical species stables? How can a star’s light give us information about the star?

Life and Earth Science – 10th Grade

The teaching of life and earth sciences (SVT) in high school provide a solid scientific education. In the 9th grade extension, it continues the civic training of the students. Discipline related to the evolution of knowledge and technologies, SVT allows both the understanding of scientific objects and methods; education in environment, health, safety, thus contributing to the training of future citizens. For that, the program is constructed around three themes: life basic organization and evolution, basis of sustainable energies, and human physiology and sport.

Technology – 10th Grade

In this course delivered in French, the students are introduced to the design process from concept to realization. In this project-based program students will be asked to use creative tools to address a variety of challenges and to learn about the design process as a mean to solve problems and generate creative ideas.

Core topics are based on the study of concepts such as the design cycle, product/industrial design, environmental design, product innovation and Architecture, as well as knowledge of materials and strategies for product development and evaluation.

From high-level conceptual thinking and brainstorming to producing, presenting, and defending tangible solutions, students are exposed to all aspects of the design cycle. In the process, students also develop communication skills, presenting ideas in front of a targeted audience; supported by the visual products they have created using technology throughout the project.

Physical Education – 10th Grade

11th Grade

Common lessons

Average weekly duration

French

4h00

History geography

3h00

English

4 h00

Modern Language

2:30 h00

Physical education and sport

2h00

Moral and civic education

0:30

Science education

2h00

Specialty courses (3 subjects)

12h00

 

French – 11th grade

The French Grade 11 program follows directly from the Grade 10. The French course pursues instructional and educational objectives that meet the aims of teaching French throughout the school curriculum: building up a personal culture, consolidating fundamental skills in written and oral expression, in reading and interpretation, with a view to training the person and the citizen.

The program is structured in 3 main parts:

  • the study of the language: the conjunctive subordinates used according to circumstantial complements, the interrogation (syntax, semantics, and pragmatics), the expression of the negation, the reinforcement of the lexicon.
  • written and oral expression: fundamental logical relationships, communication tools.
  • the objects of study: poetry, the literature of ideas and the press, the novel and the narrative, the theater.

History and Geography 11th grade

In Grade 11, the history program focuses on the subject of “nations, empires, nationalities” during the period from 1789 to the aftermath of the First World War.

In geography, the various themes studied have as a common problem “the dynamics of a recomposing world”.

The history program is structured around 4 themes:

  • Europe facing revolutions:
  • France in the Europe of Nationalities: Politics and Society (1848-1871): In this theme, we see that the idea of Nation continues
  • The Third Republic before 1914: a political regime, a colonial empire:
  • The First World War: the “suicide of Europe” and the end of the European empires:

The geography program in grade 1 is structured around 4 themes: 

  • Metropolization: a differentiated global process
  • Diversification of spaces and production players
  • Rural spaces: multifunctionality or fragmentation?
  • China: multiple spatial re-compositions

Mathematics – 11th grade

The teaching of mathematics specialization in the first general class aims to:

  • consolidate the achievements of the second class (reactivation of concepts).
  • introduce a number of new concepts.
  • develop a taste for mathematics, raise awareness of their interest in scientific activity.
  • develop interactions with other disciplines.
  • prepare for the choice of final year courses.

The assessment is organized according to several methods: supervised homework with or without a calculator, homework in free time, writing of research work, report of practical work that can be based on software.

The program is structured around five main areas: 

  • Algebra: numerical sequences, quadratic polynomials.
  • Analysis: the derivation, the variations and curves representative of the functions, the exponential function.
  • Geometry: the vectorial calculation and the scalar product, the spotted geometry.
  • Probabilities and statistics: conditional probabilities, real random variables.
  • Algorithmics and programming: notion of list.
  • Set and logical vocabulary: notion of elements, sets, logical relations, reasoning

Physics and Chemistry = 11th grade

In the 110th grade physics-chemistry by promoting experimental practice, modeling activity and by offering a concrete and contextualized approach to the concepts and phenomena studied.

It is a question of acquiring the modes of reasoning inherent in a training by the experimental sciences, to prepare the pupils for a continuation of studies in the fields of the experimental sciences, the medicine, the technology, the engineering, computer science, mathematics, etc.

The teaching of physics-chemistry is based on the programs of college and second, by sensitizing the pupil to the variability of the values ​​obtained within the framework of a series of independent measurements of a physical quantity. 

Certain skills have been retained to characterize the scientific approach:   

  • to appropriate.
  • analyze-reason.

Life and Earth Science – 11th Grade

In Grade  11, the teaching of life and earth sciences (SVT) aims to deliver solid scientific training and educate in environmental, health and safety matters, thus contributing to the training of future citizens.

Three major objectives stand out: 

  • strengthen the mastery of scientifically validated knowledge and reasoning methods specific to science, ensure the acquisition of a scientific culture based on the fundamental concepts of biology and geology.
  • participate in the training of critical thinking and civic education by understanding the current world and its evolution from a scientific perspective.
  • prepare students who so wish for further studies in higher scientific education and, beyond that, for the professions to which it leads.

The program is organized into three main themes.

  • The Earth in the Universe, life, and the evolution of living things in   order to discover a coherent explanation of the state, functioning and history of the Earth and the living world, scientifically constructed from research methods and rigorous analysis.
    • Transmission, variation, and expression of the genetic heritage.
    • The internal dynamics of the Earth.
  • Contemporary issues of the planet in order to understand the major issues facing humanity in the 21st century, those of the environment, sustainable development, management of resources and risks, etc. 
    • Ecosystems and environmental services.
  • The human body and health in order to better understand the functioning of the organism and to understand how health is defined today in a global approach integrating the individual into his environment and considering the challenges of public health. In this area, the exercise of critical thinking is particularly necessary in the face of the growing number of questions about the contributions of science.
    • Genetic variation and health.
    • The functioning of the human immune system. 

Technology – 11th grade

In digital and computer sciences (NSI), the first-year program aims to acquire the methods and the main concepts on which computer science is based (algorithms, digital data, HMI interfaces, languages, connected objects, networks and operating systems) , in its scientific and technical dimensions. 

It is about appropriating the foundations of computer science to prepare for further studies in higher education, by training in the practice of a scientific approach and by developing an appetite for research activities. .

The teaching of digital and computer sciences (NSI) is based on a necessary mastery of prior digital skills and in particular deepens the practice of programming through activities related to the main parts of the program: 

  • Data representation: basic types and values
  • Data representation: constructed types
  • Data processing in tables
  • Human-machine interactions on the web
  • Hardware architectures and operating systems
  • Languages ​​and programming
  • Algorithmic 

Physical Education – 11th grade

In accordance with the physical education curriculum of the Baccalaureate, students are graded in three sports within different athletic domains. These include, but are not limited to, lifeguarding, running (2 X 800 meters), basketball, soccer, fitness, relay running,  volleyball, and badminton.

12th Grade

Common lessons

Average weekly duration

Philosophy

4h00

History geography

3h00

English

4h00

Modern languages

2:30h00

Physical education and sport

2h00

Moral and civic education

0:30

Science education

2h00

Specialty courses (2 subjects)

12h00

 

Philosophy– 12th grade

In high school, and in final year, the objective of teaching philosophy is to provide an initial and general philosophical culture. This is why the program is a list of notions and authors which allows to tackle the major issues and to study more precisely some major texts.

Notions

  • The subject
  • Culture
  • The reason and the real
  • Politics
  • Morality

History and Geography – 12th grade

In final year, the history program focuses on the 20th century, from the crisis of the 1930s to the present day. It broadens the international dimension and allows the learner to understand the great upheavals experienced by the world in less than a century.

Globalization is the central subject of this Geography program. The learner is led to study the consequences of the globalization process on the territories.

The classroom history program is structured around 4 themes:

  • Fragilities of democracies, totalitarianisms, and the Second World War (1929-1945)
  • The multiplication of international actors in a bipolar world (from 1945 to the beginning of the 1970s)
  • Economic, political, and social challenges from the 1970s to 1991
  • The world, Europe, and France since the 1990s, between cooperation and conflicts

The classroom geography program also revolves around 4 themes: 

  • Seas and oceans: at the heart of globalization
  • Territorial dynamics, cooperation, and tensions in globalization
  • The European Union in globalization: complex dynamics
  • France and its regions in the European Union and in globalization: lines of force and re-compositions.

Mathematics – 12th grade

The final year mathematics specialty program aims to:

  • deepen the mathematical culture essential to life as a citizen.
  • provide the necessary bases for any further study project. 
  • provide a solid mathematical background to students wishing to engage in higher scientific studies, by training them in the practice of a scientific approach and by strengthening their taste for research activities.
  • cultivate skills that facilitate lifelong learning and help to better understand a changing society.

The evaluation methods are varied, in line with the objectives pursued. In particular, the ability to use the computer tool in the context of problem solving is to be assessed. 

Program:

  • Algebra and geometry
  • Analysis
  • Probabilities
  • Algorithmic and programming
  • Set and logical vocabulary

Physics and Chemistry – 12th grade

In physics-chemistry, the final year program is a continuation of that of the first class, by promoting experimental practice, modeling activity and by offering a concrete and contextualized approach to the concepts and phenomena studied.

It is a question of acquiring the modes of reasoning inherent in a training by the experimental sciences, to prepare the pupils for a continuation of studies in the fields of the experimental sciences, the medicine, the technology, the engineering, computer science, mathematics, etc.

The teaching of physics and chemistry aims to make the pupil aware of the variability of the values ​​obtained within the framework of a series of independent measurements of a physical quantity. 

The program is structured around several main themes: 

  • Measurements and uncertainties.
  • Constitution and transformations of matter.
  • Movement and interactions.
  • Energy conversions and transfers.
  • Waves and signals. 

This teaching contributes to the acquisition of the experimental, digital and oral skills of each student, with links made between the various scientific courses. 

The history of science is also present, in order to allow a better contextualization of the notions of physics-chemistry.

Life and Earth Science – 12th Grade

In Grade 11, the teaching of life and earth sciences (SVT) aims to deliver solid scientific training and educate in health, safety, and environment, thus contributing to the training of future citizens.

Three major objectives stand out:

  • strengthen the mastery of scientifically validated knowledge and reasoning methods specific to science, ensure the acquisition of a scientific culture based on the fundamental concepts of biology and geology.
  • participate in the training of critical thinking and civic education by understanding the current world and its evolution from a scientific perspective.
  • prepare students who so wish for further studies in higher scientific education and, beyond that, for the professions to which it leads.

The program is organized into three main themes.

  • Earth, life, and the organization of living things
  • Contemporary issues of the planet
  • Human body and health

Technology – 12th grade

In digital and computer sciences (NSI), the final-year program aims to acquire the methods and the main concepts on which computer science is based (algorithms, digital data, HMI interfaces, languages, connected objects, networks and operating systems) , in its scientific and technical dimensions. 

It is about appropriating the foundations of computer science to prepare for further studies in higher education, by training in the practice of a scientific approach and by developing an appetite for research activities. .

The teaching of digital and computer sciences (NSI) is based on a necessary mastery of prior digital skills and in particular deepens the practice of programming through activities related to the main parts of the program: 

  • Data representation: basic types and values
  • Data representation: constructed types
  • Data processing in tables
  • Human-machine interactions on the web
  • Hardware architectures and operating systems
  • Languages and programming
  • Algorithmic 

Physical Education – 12th grade

In accordance with the physical education curriculum of the Baccalaureate, students are graded in three sports within different athletic domains. These include, but are not limited to, lifeguarding, running (2 X 800 meters), basketball, soccer, fitness, relay running,  volleyball, and badminton.

 

 

 

English

Mathematics

History, Geography, and Economics

Science

English

Pre-AP English II

English II focuses on the study of major works of world literature and writing. Selected works include fiction, non-fiction, poetry, and drama. The student is expected to read critically in order to ascertain meaning. Writing instruction focuses on literary analysis and the art of persuasion. Students are encouraged to engage in “free reading” as much as possible to reinforce and extend the concepts taught in class and to encourage them to develop a lifelong habit of reading for pleasure.

Mathematics

Algebra 2

Students will build on the knowledge and skills for mathematics in kindergarten-Grade 8 and Algebra I. Students will broaden their knowledge of quadratic functions, exponential functions, and systems of equations. Students will study logarithmic, square root, cubic, cube root, absolute value, rational functions, and their related equations. Students will connect functions to their inverses and associated equations and solutions in both mathematical and real-world situations. In addition, students will extend their knowledge of data analysis and numeric and algebraic methods.

Precalculus

Precalculus is a course that combines reviews of algebra, geometry, and functions into a preparatory course for calculus. The first semester covers trigonometric ratios and functions; inverse trigonometric functions; applications of trigonometry, including laws of cosine and sine. The second semester includes linear, quadratic, exponential, logarithmic, radical, polynomial, and rational functions.

Advanced Quantitative Reasoning (AQR)

AQR is a fourth-year mathematics course that equips students with a mathematical process to arrive at real- world solutions. In AQR, students will continue to build on the K-8, Algebra I, Algebra II, and Geometry foundations as well as expanding the understanding through other mathematical experiences. The primary focal points of AQR include the analysis of information using statistical methods and probability, modeling change and mathematical relationships, mathematical decision making in finance, and spatial and geometric modeling for decision making.

History, Geography, and Economics

World History

The World History curriculum is a rich, integrated study of historical events with significant consequences for the evolution of man, culture, institutions, customs, thought, ideas, and philosophy. Students will read and frequently examine historical events and perspectives to obtain knowledge and comprehensive skills while developing into a global citizen.

US History

This course promotes the ongoing development of students’ knowledge and skills in the areas of historical analysis, evaluation, and synthesis. This goal will be accomplished through various learning experiences throughout each six weeks. The primary goal of the U.S. History course is the ongoing development in the areas of analysis, evaluation, and synthesis in the 11th grade IB student. This goal will be accomplished through various assignments throughout each six weeks. The United States history course covers the time frame from 1877 through the present day.

Government

In United States Government, the focus is on the principles and beliefs upon which the United States was founded and on the structure, functions, and powers of government at the national, state, and local levels. Students learn major political ideas and forms of government in history. A significant focus of the course is on the U.S. Constitution, its underlying principles and ideas, and the form of government it created. Students analyze major concepts of republicanism, federalism, checks and balances, separation of powers, popular sovereignty, and individual rights and compare the U.S. system of government with other political systems.

Economics

Economics with Emphasis on the Free Enterprise System and Its Benefits is the culmination of the economic content and concepts studied from kindergarten through required secondary courses. The focus is on the basic principles concerning production, consumption, and distribution of goods and services (the problem of scarcity) in the United States and a comparison with those in other countries around the world. Students analyze the interaction of supply, demand, and price. Students will investigate the concepts of specialization and international trade, economic growth, key economic measurements, and monetary and fiscal policy

Science

Biology

This course will introduce students to inquiry-based learning through laboratory experiments and discussions based on biology as foundation for understanding biology. Topics include an introduction to biological molecules, membrane structure and function, expression of genetic information, the cell cycle, and cancer. This course will also introduce students to the fundamentals of science, such as the scientific method to advance investigations into cell structure and function as a consequence of evolutionary processes. Lastly, this class will educate students about the importance of taxonomy classification, ecosystems, plant systems, and body systems.

Chemistry 1

This course is designed for students to understand the fundamental principles of chemistry which characterize the properties of matter and how it reacts. The course is taught using the flipped homework using carefully selected online videos (or online course resources) and traditional classroom discussion with hands on laboratory techniques. Throughout the course students are taught to obtain, organize, and analyze data. Conclusions are developed using both qualitative and quantitative procedures.

Physics 1

In this course, students will learn to analyze the physical interactions that govern reality and develop novel solutions to global problems using mathematical models. The relationship between course concepts and the environment is emphasized as part of the middle school fundamental concepts. The students will be encouraged to adapt the IB learner profile to their own academic development as the study the physics curriculum and its lab applications.

 

 

Specialty Courses

3 academic specialties chosen by the student in 11th grade

2 academic specialties chosen by the student in 12th grade

 

Humanities, Literature and Philosophy

The Humanities, Literature and Philosophy specialty offers the study of literature and philosophy from all eras through a variety of texts in order to refine students thought process, culture and knowledge. It is based on several major philosophical themes that have accompanied humanity, from ancient Greece to the modern world. This class develops the students’ ability to analyze points of view, to formulate a reasoned personal reflection, and to debate issues that are relevant to the major issues of humanity.

Understanding the contemporary world through the study of political, social, and economic issues, with special focus on international relations.

Foreign Languages, Literature and Culture

Mastery of a foreign language and the in-depth understanding of its culture.

Mathematics

The mathematics specialty allows students to explore and use math as a tool across a number of fields, such as: algebra, geometry, analysis, statistics, algorithms, and programming. The course also includes the history of mathematics, providing a lens through which to identify the evolution of core mathematical theories, enabling students to have a broader understanding of the material. 

In the course, the use of software, modeling tools, and simulation programs encourages experimentation and practical use. The class promotes cross-curriculum interactions with other subjects such as chemistry, physics, engineering, biology, social studies, and economics.

Usage of abstract Math (theory) (Geometry, Algebra, Differential Analysis…) to apply and solve real life problems (Finance, Economics, Science, Engineering…)

Physics Chemistry

The Physics-Chemistry specialty offers students the opportunity to explore the real world, from microscopic to macroscopic, by studying the organization and transformations of matter, movement, energy, waves, and signals. Students will use the two founding aspects of the discipline, experimentation, and modeling, leading to the mathematical formulation of validated physical laws. The many fields of application in both everyday life and related to major societal issues (energy, environment) give students some concrete, living and current picture of physics and chemistry.

Organization and transformation of matter, motion and interaction, conversion and energy transfer, waves, and signals.

Life Science (Biology and Earth Science)

The Earth and Life Sciences (or Biology) specialty explores the themes of the Earth and its environment, the human body and health, and natural evolution. The program helps students develop skills of observation, experimentation, model-building, analysis and debating – all of which are indispensable to pursue a higher education or career in these fields of study. This specialty explores the following scientific themes: Life on Earth, biodiversity, evolution, ecosystems, ecology, and the history of the Earth. It also provides students with a better understanding of the functioning of their own body, combining scientific concepts with a reflexion on one’s personal health, as well as an ethical and civic reflection of public health and the environment. This specialty draws from and builds upon previously acquired knowledge in physics, chemistry, math, and computer science.

Organization of living organisms, the human body, structure of the planet, and major global issues.

Social Sciences

The Economics and Social Sciences specialty deepens students’ mastery of the concepts of economics, sociology, and political science by analyzing the major issues in today’s societies. This course contributes to improving students’ economic and sociological understanding through the study of microeconomics and fundamentals of economy, and by proposing a multidisciplinary approach that relies notably on the social sciences.

Economics, Sociology and Political Science to better understand societal issues.

 

 



Art I (Elective)  10th grade

Using a problem-solving approach, students improve their drawing skills, gain a deeper understanding of color, and learn to organize more meaningful compositions. They create drawings, collages, prints, paintings, and sculptures in order to communicate personal ideas and solve visual problems. One important area of focus involves the depiction of pictorial space. Overlapping, linear, and atmospheric perspective and the rendering of volume are explored to equip students with the tools they need to construct pictorial space with clarity and confidence. Students undertake both in-class and out-of-class projects and discuss their works during class critiques. In addition, they begin to build a portfolio that shows the range, depth, and quality of their artistic knowledge. This course is taught in English.

Integrated Mathematics 10 (French American Program)

Topics covered in this course include number sets and their properties, as well as variations and graphing of the following functions: linear, reciprocal, quadratic, cubic, square, and homographic. Also, algebraic, and rational expressions, factoring, and algebraic and graphic resolution of nonlinear equations and inequalities. Statistics and probability: percentage increase and decrease, measuring central tendency and dispersion, frequencies distribution, simulation, and sampling and range of fluctuations. Sample space, events, equiprobable spaces, finite probability spaces, intersection, and union of events. In Euclidean geometry: trigonometry of a right triangle, plane and space properties, plane configurations, straight lines. The emphasis is placed on training in logical reasoning in analytic and vector geometry: equation of a line, vectors (coordinates, sum, difference, multiplication by a real number, norm, determinant), and systems of linear equations. Algorithms: basic (variables, input, output, expressions, functions), conditional statements, iterative loops, pseudo-code. Application in programming with Python language. Set mathematical notation and logical reasoning (connectors, negation, truth tables, propositions, logical implication). Graphing calculator, geometry software. This course is taught in French.

Art II (Elective) 11th grade

Students complete a variety of assignments that require them to think more creatively and work more independently. In the process, they begin to develop their own visual voices. They take part in group critiques of their work and art history discussions, as well as enjoy other experiences that help them develop an awareness of their own artistic sensibilities and concerns. The ultimate goal of the course is to prepare them technically and conceptually for further study of art at FASNY and in college. Students focus on improving their ability to render complex natural forms from direct observation. In particular, they explore the beauty of the human form through lessons on proportion, shading, gesture, the skeletal system, and capturing the expressive qualities of the model. They continue the development of a portfolio of original artwork that can be used for further study in art, as preparation for the Baccalaureate exam, or as a supplement to their college applications.

Music (Elective) 11th grade

This course focuses on musical practices. Group listening is emphasized, allowing students to deepen their understanding of music through a study of space, time, color, and form. They are exposed to a variety of musical works of different eras, genres, and styles. Teaching is enriched by music practices (both vocal and instrumental). This course is taught in French.

Arabic 1

This is a novice level course designed to teach students the basics of Arabic phonology, morphology, calligraphy, syntax, and semantics as well as a brief introduction to Arabic history and culture. This is a prerequisite to Arabic 2.

Arabic 2

This is an intermediate level course designed to develop further students’ knowledge of Arabic phonology, morphology, calligraphy, syntax, and semantics as well as continue exploring Arabic history and culture. This is a prerequisite to Arabic 3. (Must have completed Arabic 1 with at least a 70 average).

Arabic 3

This is an advanced-low level course in Arabic morphology, syntax, and composition; students will delve deeper into understanding Arab customs and relevant historic events. This course is a prerequisite to Arabic 4. (Must have completed level 2 with at least a 70 average).

Arabic 4

Arabic 4 is an advanced course for non-native speakers. Topics include etymology, composition, advanced morphology, advanced syntax, and Arab culture and history. (Must have completed Arabic 3 with at least a 70 average).

Chinese 1

In Chinese 1, you will learn basic Chinese vocabulary and how to make simple sentences in Chinese. You will learn how to pronounce Chinese using the Pinyin Romanization system and you will learn how to write the characters and pronounce the four tones in the Chinese language. We will spend time learning about the Chinese culture, some important events in Chinese history, social behaviors, cultural norms, and Chinese festivals. We will have a special celebration for Chinese New Year. We will also have a Chinese calligrapher visit our class and show us how to write Chinese characters with the traditional maobi (writing brush) and ink stone.

Chinese 2

In Chinese 2, you will continue your study of basic Chinese. Students will learn vocabulary and how to build sentences for shopping, days of the week, how to tell time, colors, how to count money , make phone calls to friends, and many basic daily routine vocabularies. Students will continue learning correct stroke order for writing the characters and will learn the correct tones for each word. Each semester the class will read one outside reading book about China. This book will be provided by the teacher. We will have a special celebration for Chinese New Year. We will also have a Chinese calligrapher visit our class and show us how to write Chinese characters with the traditional maobi (writing brush) and ink stone.

Chinese 3

In Chinese 3, you will continue your study of basic Chinese. Students will learn vocabulary and how to build sentences for a more extensive study of Chinese than that of Chinese II. Units cover a variety of topics. Students will begin writing longer essays in Chinese and practicing oral presentations.

Chinese 4

This course will be more rigorous than previous Chinese classes. There will be continuous additions of new vocabulary outside the textbook. There will also be opportunities to write and read higher level assignments.

French 1

Students are introduced to the stud y of French by expanding their knowledge of key vocabulary topics and grammar concepts. Students not only begin to comprehend basic vocabulary words in French, but they also start to express themselves more meaningfully in both speaking and writing. Each unit consists of a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, reading and listening comprehension activities, speaking, and writing activities, multimedia cultural presentations, and interactive activities and practices which reinforce vocabulary and grammar. There is a strong emphasis on providing context and conversational examples for the language concepts presented in each unit. Students should expect to be actively engaged in their own language learning, understand common vocabulary terms and phrases, use a wide range of grammar patterns in their speaking and writing, participate in conversations and respond appropriately to conversational prompts, analyze, and compare cultural practices, products, and perspectives of various French speaking countries.

French 2

Students continue their further study of French by expanding their knowledge of key vocabulary topics and grammar concepts. Students not only continue to fully comprehend listening and reading passages, but they also start to express themselves more meaningfully in both speaking and writing. Each unit consists of a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, reading and listening comprehension activities, speaking, and writing activities, multimedia cultural presentations, and interactive activities and practices which reinforce vocabulary and grammar. There is a stronger emphasis on providing context and conversational examples for the language concepts presented in each unit. Students should expect to be more actively engaged in their own language learning, understand common vocabulary terms and phrases, use a wide range of grammar patterns in their speaking and writing, participate in conversations and respond appropriately to conversational prompts, analyze, and compare cultural practices, products, and perspectives of various French speaking countries. In Semester 2, the course is conducted almost entirely in French.

French 3

The course begins with a review of the material covered in phases 3 and 4. Other objectives of this course include 1. Improve communicative proficiency in the four skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing. 2. Expand vocabulary and grammar. 3. Increase awareness and curiosity of French Speaking cultures and encourage a life-long love of language acquisition and exploration of new cultures.

French 4

This course is designed to prepare the student to take the Standard Level French International Baccalaureate Exam this school year. Students continue to develop vocabulary and perfect fluency in contextual, conversational situations. Course readings focus on the following: Customs and Traditions, Cultural Diversity, Leisure Activities, Health, Science and Technology. The course also includes a thorough grammar review combined with various written and oral exercises.

German 1

This is an active class that gives the beginning student the vocabulary necessary to communicate on a basic level with German speakers on a variety of familiar subjects such as school, home, activities, etc. The student will learn how to formulate sentences and dialogues through listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Cultural activities will accompany language lessons to acquaint students with food, artistic expression, and diversity of the German-speaking world.

German 2

This course continues the development of listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills, with increasing emphasis on the practice of reading and writing. Students develop creativity and facility with the language using concrete vocabulary within meaningful contexts. Students also continue to explore contemporary German-speaking cultures. Students will work with an open educational resource for this course: an interactive, online, and free textbook designed to meet the learning needs of Macalester students.

German 3

Students continue to develop their proficiency in speaking, listening, writing, and reading by interacting with other speakers of German. Students will understand oral and written messages in the target language and will make level-appropriate oral and written presentations. Students communicate on a variety of topics using complex structures, moving from concrete to more abstract concepts. They will comprehend the main ideas of authentic materials that they read and hear and are able to identify significant details when topics are familiar.

Spanish 1

This course will provide the student with a general introduction to the Spanish language: sound system, pronunciation, functional vocabulary related to everyday life, cultural information, and basic grammatical structures. Emphasis will be on the acquisition of four skills: listening, speaking, reading and limited writing. There are two main objectives to the course. Foremost is to give the students the ability to carry on a simple conversation. The second is to provide the students with instruction that teaches a basic understanding of Spanish culture, vocabulary, and grammatical concepts.

Spanish 2

This course is designed to continue the introduction to the Spanish language and culture of Spanish-speaking countries. We will be utilizing real world experiences to practice for the globalized community. The linguistic abilities necessary to achieve the specific objective middle school are: speaking and listening, writing, and reading comprehension.

Spanish 3

This course builds upon knowledge gained in Spanish 1 & 2. The course is a continuation and recycling of knowledge acquired in Spanish 1 and Spanish 2, as well as an introduction to new vocabulary, structures, and expressions. Students will be expected to expand their vocabulary range to include more sophisticated terms, use advanced language expressions, verb tenses and grammatical concepts.

Spanish 4

Instruction in Spanish 4 consists of a communicative method with an emphasis on grammar, vocabulary, literature, and culture to strengthen a student’s proficiency in Spanish. Students will have an opportunity to strengthen reading, speaking, listening, and writing skills through individual and group activities.

AP English Language and Composition

AP English Language and Composition (11th grade)

AP English Language and Composition engages students in becoming skilled readers of prose written in a variety of periods, disciplines, and rhetorical contexts, and in becoming skilled writers who compose for a variety of purposes. Both their writing and their reading should make students aware of the interactions among a writer’s purposes and audience expectations, as well as the way generic conventions and the resources of language contribute to effectiveness in writing. Students will also learn to read primary and secondary sources carefully, to synthesize material from these texts in their own compositions, and to cite sources using conventions recommended by professional organizations such as the Modern Language Association (MLA). The course will help students move beyond such programmatic responses as the five- paragraph essay. Students will be encouraged to place emphasis on content, purpose, and audience and to allow this focus to guide the organization of their writing. Both formal and informal contexts will allow students to gain authority and take risks in writing. The course will address the importance of graphic and visual images in texts published in print and electronic media.

While the course assumes that students already understand and use standard English grammar, it also reflects the practice of reinforcing writing conventions at every level. The intense concentration on language use in the course enhances students’ ability to use grammatical conventions appropriately and to develop stylistic maturity in their prose. When students read, they will become aware of how stylistic effects are achieved through a writer’s linguistic choices. Thus, students will use literature to understand rhetorical and linguistic choices rather than to study literary conventions.

AP English Literature and Composition (12th grade)

The AP English Literature and Composition course is designed to engage students in the careful reading and critical analysis of imaginative literature. Through the close reading of selected texts, students can deepen their understanding of the ways writers use language to provide both meaning and pleasure for their readers. As they read, students should consider a work’s structure, style, and themes, as well as such smaller-scale elements as the use of figurative language, imagery, symbolism, and tone.

AP History and Social Sciences

AP European History

AP European History is an introductory college-level European history course. Students cultivate their understanding of European history through analyzing historical sources and learning to make connections and craft historical arguments as they explore concepts like interaction of Europe and the world; economic and commercial developments; cultural and intellectual developments; states and other institutions of power; social organization and development; national and European identity; and technological and scientific innovation.

AP United States History

The AP program in United States history is designed to provide students with the analytic skills and factual knowledge necessary to deal critically with the problems and materials in United States history. This program prepares students for intermediate and advanced college courses by making demands upon them equivalent to those made by semester introductory college courses. Students should learn to assess historical materials – their relevance to a given interpretive problem, their reliability and their importance – and to weigh the evidence and interpretations presented in historical scholarship. AP US History is designed to be taught at the college level and is meant to be a demanding and challenging experience for high school students. The primary objective in this class is the continued advancement of student information processing skills where strong emphasis on improving each student’s information processing skills, with an emphasis on improving their ability to analyze and evaluate the importance of historical data and their ability to express those ideas in written form. Through college-level AP courses, you enter a universe of knowledge that might otherwise remain unexplored in high school; through AP Exams, you have the opportunity to earn credit or advanced standing at most of the nation’s colleges and universities.

AP World History

AP World History is a college-level course that is structured around the investigation of six major themes through six different chronological periods. The six periods from roughly 8000 BCE to the present provide the chronological framework for the course. The six themes are: Interaction between Humans and the Environment; Development and Interaction of Cultures; State-building, Expansion and Conflict; Creation, Expansion, and Interaction of Economic Systems; Development and Transformation of Social Structures; Analysis of Change and Continuity over Time. Students are expected to develop historical thinking skills such as analyzing cause and effect, creating historical arguments using historical evidence, comparing, and contrasting historical developments within one society, or across different societies, and interpreting and synthesizing historical arguments. Students will develop skills that will aid them in writing the three different essay types included on the AP exam (Document Based Question, Change and Continuity Over Time and Compare/Contrast).

AP Macroeconomics

The purpose of an AP course in macroeconomics is to give students a thorough understanding of the principles of economics that apply to an economic system as a whole. Such a course places particular emphasis on the study of national income and price-level determination, and also develops students’ familiarity with economic performance measures, the financial sector, stabilization policies, economic growth, and international economics.

AP Microeconomics

The purpose of an AP course in microeconomics is to give students a thorough understanding of the principles of economics that apply to the functions of individual decision makers, both consumers and producers, within the economic system. It places primary emphasis on the nature and functions of product markets and includes the study of factor markets and of the role of government in promoting greater efficiency and equity in the economy.

AP Math and Computer Science

AP Calculus

AP Calculus AB is roughly equivalent to a first semester college calculus course devoted to topics in differential and integral calculus. The AP course covers topics in these areas, including concepts and skills of limits, derivatives, definite integrals, and the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus. The course teaches students to approach calculus concepts and problems when they are represented graphically, numerically, analytically, and verbally, and to make connections amongst these representations.

Teachers and students regularly use technology to reinforce relationships among functions, to confirm written work, to implement experimentation, and to assist in interpreting results. Through the use of the unifying themes of calculus (e.g., derivatives, integrals, limits, approximation, and applications and modeling) the course becomes cohesive rather than a collection of unrelated topics.

Specific Skills for Success

  • Before studying calculus, all students should complete four years of secondary mathematics designed for college-bound students: courses in which they study algebra, geometry, trigonometry, analytic geometry, and elementary functions. These functions include linear, polynomial, rational, exponential, logarithmic, trigonometric, inverse trigonometric, and piecewise-defined functions.
  • In particular, before studying calculus, students must be familiar with the properties of functions, the algebra of functions, and the graphs of functions.
  • Students must also understand the language of functions (domain and range, odd and even, periodic, symmetry, zeros, intercepts, and so on) and know the values of the trigonometric functions at various numbers.

AP Statistics

In AP Statistics, students will learn how to collect, organize, analyze, and interpret data. Students will learn the content while working on several real-world projects throughout the school year. These projects reinforce the content while displaying how Statistics is becoming an increasingly important field in today’s society.

Specific Skills for Success

  • AP Statistics is for students on an advanced track in mathematics who have already taken their second year of algebra.
  • AP Statistics brings the real world and the math world together in a way that other math courses do not, requiring students to be able to reason both quantitatively and qualitatively.

AP Science

AP Biology

AP Biology is an introductory college-level biology course. Students cultivate their understanding of biology through inquiry-based investigations as they explore the following topics: evolution, cellular processes, energy and communication, genetics, information transfer, ecology, and interactions.

 

 

The International Option of the French Baccalaureate Courses

English Language and Literature 

English Language and Literature  – Honors OIB – 11th grade

This advanced, college-level reading and writing course is the first year of the two-year English OIB program. It devotes a significant portion of study to an in-depth analysis of the various literary genres—fiction, poetry, drama, and nonfiction—as recommended by the International Option of the French Baccalaureate. In addition to studying a wide range of genres, students also will work on developing their writing skills through a variety of writing activities, including formal analytical essays, creative-writing pieces, and short responses.

Course texts feature works from the 19th to the 21st centuries by authors from around the globe and may include such works as Frankenstein by Mary Shelley, Heart of Darkness by Joseph Conrad, A Streetcar Named Desire by Tennessee Williams, The Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood, Interpreter of Maladies by Jhumpa Lahiri, A Room of One’s Own by Virginia Woolf, “Stranger in the Village” by James Baldwin, and a selection of poems by Elizabeth Bishop, Sylvia Plath, and Adrienne Rich. This course is taught at a native level.

English Language and Literature  – Honors OIB – 12th grade

This advanced, college-level reading and writing course is the second year of the two-year English OIB program. Building on the work done by students in grade 11, this course not only devotes a significant portion of study to an in-depth analysis of the various literary genres—fiction, poetry, drama, and nonfiction—it also prepares students for the Baccalaureate exam through periodic mock written and oral tests taken in exam conditions. In addition to essays written in exam conditions, students develop their writing skills through a variety of writing activities, including journals, short responses, and creative-writing pieces. A significant portion of the year is dedicated to extensive study of the works in depth—those texts that will be the focus of the Baccalaureate oral exam—with particular focus on students developing strategies and techniques for effectively close-reading the language, literary features, and meaning of significant passages from those works.

Texts and authors include, but are not limited to, Crime and Punishment by Fyodor Dostoevsky, The Tempest by William Shakespeare, Beloved by Toni Morrison, Intimate Apparel by Lynn Nottage, and a selection of poems by Robert Frost. This course is taught at a native level.

Modern World History and Geography

Modern World History and Geography I – Honors OIB 11th grade

This is the first course in a demanding two-year history/geography program that covers many of the events and themes that shaped the modern world. Chronologically, the history program begins with the French Revolution and ends with World War I. Thematically, students gain an understanding of the foundations of modern political and economic history, through their study of the Dual Revolution, Western Imperialism, the long-term causes of World War I and its immediate aftermath. They probe topics such as modern democracy, foreign policy, and economic and social transformations through case studies from France and the United States. In the geography portion of the course, students are introduced to the concept of globalization, through the study of modern cities and rural areas and how they create productive exchange networks at different spatial scales: locally, regionally, and globally. In both history and geography, students develop their ability to analyze and interpret documents (press articles, cartoons, photographs, memoirs, maps, charts, etc.) and to write college-level essays. They also hone their research and writing skills through a research paper. There is an emphasis on oral presentation in both history and geography.

Modern World History and Geography II – Honors OIB 12th grade

This is the second course in a demanding two-year history/geography program that covers the global events and themes that have shaped the modern world. The culminating examination is the History/Geography portion of the OIB (International Option) of the French Baccalaureate exam, which is comprised of both a four-hour written exam and a half-hour oral exam.

In 12th grade, the history portion of the course takes a thematic approach to understanding the modern world. In addition to a focus on international politics and challenges to prevailing political models, the course places a heavy emphasis on the causes and consequences of the major economic and social transformations of the 20th century.

In geography, students study the territorial dynamics, cooperation, and tensions inherent in our globalized economy. The curriculum includes in-depth studies of the importance of maritime spaces and how globalization impacts various territories on different scales (global cities, nation-states, regional partnerships such as the European Union). Students also develop expertise in the analysis of geo-political, geo-economic, geo-cultural, and geo-environmental maps.